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COMPUTERS 101

 

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How to Buy a Refurbished Computer

If you are looking to buy a refurbished computer that is capable and trustworthy, make sure that you take the following steps: Decide your needs First of all, decide what you really need. Do you need a computer to browse the internet and nothing else, or do you want a powerhouse that can play heavy games, edit huge video files and perform other impressive tricks? Once you are clear, set a realistic budget! Do your research Once you know what your expectations are, browse different websites and forums to find out which refurbished models fulfil your needs. Ask questions if anything is not clear. Know what you are getting Most refurbished computers cannot be regarded as a complete package. One refurbished model may lack a monitor, while another may not come with a power cord. Sometimes, you may get a keyboard and a mouse with the computer. So, before clicking on the buy button, find out what is actually included and what you will have to purchase additionally. Choose the right store Do not just go for the cheapest deal from the shadiest website you can find. Instead, try to look for a trustworthy seller even if you have to pay a bit extra. Amazon, Newegg, Best Buy, TigerDirect etc. are good places to buy refurbished computers. The same can be said about Dell Factory Outlet. Keep an eye on warranty Never buy a refurbished computer that comes with no warranty if you can help it. If a computer has genuine parts, it should include warranty. Also, look for manufacturer warranty, and not for third-party warranty. Usually, you should be able to get a warranty of at least 3 months, although some manufacturers provide warranty equal to that on their new products. If you can find the option to extend warranty, that’s even better! Does it still make sense to build a computer? Here’s some insight provided by cnet.com: Last summer I asked readers if it still made sense to buy a desktop. After all, laptops now offer more than ample power for most users, plus that whole portability thing. And with tablets starting to take the place of laptops, a desktop seems even farther down the computing food chain. Then, a couple weeks back, I featured a nicely loaded desktop on my Cheapskate blog -- the first one in a while -- figuring most readers would respond with a yawn. Quite the opposite. Turns out a lot of computer users still love desktops, and definitely want more deals on them. And I've complied with several since then, many of them selling out in the span of an afternoon. You can read more about this question by clicking on this link: https://www.cnet.com/news/does-it-still-make-sense-to-build-your-own-computer/

Newsworthy

IBM’s New, Cutting Edge Tech

Could Make Computers 200

Times Faster

Regular desktop computers, as well as laptops and smartphones, have processing units dedicated to computing and memory. They’re called von Neumann systems and are named after physicist and computer scientist John von Neumann who, among other things, was a pioneer in modern digital computing. They work by moving data back and forth between the memory and computing unit; a process that can, and often does, end up being slow and not very efficient. At least, not as fast or efficient as what we could achieve using “computational memory.” Also known as “in-memory computing,” computational memory allows for storing and processing information using just the physical properties of a computer system’s memory. A team from IBM Research claims to have made a breakthrough in computational memory by successfully using one million phase change memory (PCM) devices to run an unsupervised machine learning algorithm. Details of the research have been published in the journal Nature Communications. Read the full article
© Computer Lab Inc. 2010, All Rights Reserved
COMPUTERS 101

COMPUTERS 101

How to Buy a Refurbished Computer

If you are looking to buy a refurbished computer that is capable and trustworthy, make sure that you take the following steps: Decide your needs First of all, decide what you really need. Do you need a computer to browse the internet and nothing else, or do you want a powerhouse that can play heavy games, edit huge video files and perform other impressive tricks? Once you are clear, set a realistic budget! Do your research Once you know what your expectations are, browse different websites and forums to find out which refurbished models fulfil your needs. Ask questions if anything is not clear. Know what you are getting Most refurbished computers cannot be regarded as a complete package. One refurbished model may lack a monitor, while another may not come with a power cord. Sometimes, you may get a keyboard and a mouse with the computer. So, before clicking on the buy button, find out what is actually included and what you will have to purchase additionally. Choose the right store Do not just go for the cheapest deal from the shadiest website you can find. Instead, try to look for a trustworthy seller even if you have to pay a bit extra. Amazon, Newegg, Best Buy, TigerDirect etc. are good places to buy refurbished computers. The same can be said about Dell Factory Outlet. Keep an eye on warranty Never buy a refurbished computer that comes with no warranty if you can help it. If a computer has genuine parts, it should include warranty. Also, look for manufacturer warranty, and not for third-party warranty. Usually, you should be able to get a warranty of at least 3 months, although some manufacturers provide warranty equal to that on their new products. If you can find the option to extend warranty, that’s even better! Does it still make sense to build a computer? Here’s some insight provided by cnet.com: Last summer I asked readers if it still made sense to buy a desktop. After all, laptops now offer more than ample power for most users, plus that whole portability thing. And with tablets starting to take the place of laptops, a desktop seems even farther down the computing food chain. Then, a couple weeks back, I featured a nicely loaded desktop on my Cheapskate blog -- the first one in a while -- figuring most readers would respond with a yawn. Quite the opposite. Turns out a lot of computer users still love desktops, and definitely want more deals on them. And I've complied with several since then, many of them selling out in the span of an afternoon. You can read more about this question by clicking on this link: https://www.cnet.com/news/does-it-still-make- sense-to-build-your-own-computer/

Newsworthy

IBM’s New, Cutting Edge Tech Could

Make Computers 200 Times Faster

Regular desktop computers, as well as laptops and smartphones, have processing units dedicated to computing and memory. They’re called von Neumann systems and are named after physicist and computer scientist John von Neumann who, among other things, was a pioneer in modern digital computing. They work by moving data back and forth between the memory and computing unit; a process that can, and often does, end up being slow and not very efficient. At least, not as fast or efficient as what we could achieve using “computational memory.” Also known as “in- memory computing,” computational memory allows for storing and processing information using just the physical properties of a computer system’s memory. A team from IBM Research claims to have made a breakthrough in computational memory by successfully using one million phase change memory (PCM) devices to run an unsupervised machine learning algorithm. Details of the research have been published in the journal Nature Communications. Read the full article